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The global fight over copyright control: Is David beating Goliath at his own game?

In the past few years, many governments have attempted to curb online “piracy” by enforcing harsher copyright control upon Internet users. Yana Breindl and François Briatte discuss their Policy and Internet paper Digital Protest Skills and Online Activism Against Copyright Reform in France and the European Union, which explores how the introduction of harsher intellectual property regulations has resulted in intense online and offline collective action by skilled activists who have significantly altered the digital copyright policy field.

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Internet, Politics, Policy 2010: Wrap-Up

Our two-day conference is just about to come to an end with an evening reception at Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum (you can have a live view through OII’s very own webcam…). Its aim was to try to make an assessment of the Internet’s impact on politics and policy. The presentations approached this challenge from a number of […]

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Our two-day conference is coming to a close with a keynote by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger who is soon to be joining the faculty of the Oxford Internet Institute as Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation. Viktor talked about the theme of his recent book“Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age”(a webcast of this keynote will […]

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The first day of the conference found an end in style with a well-received reception at Oxford’s fine Divinity Schools. Day Two of the conference kicked off with panels on “Mobilisation and Agenda Setting”,“Virtual Goods” and “Comparative Campaigning”.  ICTlogy has been busy summarising some of the panels at the conference including this morning one’s with some interesting contributions […]

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This panel was one of three in the first round of panels and has been focusing on ePetitions. Two contributions from Germany and two contributions from the UK brought a useful comparative perspective to the debate. ePetitions are an interesting research object because not only is petitioning a rather popular political participation activity offline but […]

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Arthur Lupia has just been delivering the opening keynote on our very own conference “Internet, Politics, Policy 2010: An Impact Assessment” here in Oxford. He started by turning on the audience: What is our impact on the Internet? Have we been as effective as we could have been in changing people’s beliefs and behaviours? However, this […]

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