5 questions to explore the rhetoric about #OpenAccess

11 November 2014 0

Gold OA “operate under a reversed business model to the traditional subscription-based publishing model. Instead of charging users a fee to read the content, they charge an open access fee at the beginning of the publication process and this enables all the content to be made freely available” [if the author can afford it]. Source: Springer… Read More »

Flexible models for funding open access in journal publishing

One of the main challenges that the Open Access movement faces is to explore (more) economically sustainable models to embrace and support an inclusive openness (not only for a few). In this post we present a work-in-progress including nine remarkable cases that pursue OA and flexible funding models. An overview of this benchmark comparing these… Read More »

The opposite of open isn’t closed but broken

Although the advocates of Creative Commons seems to be more than those who challenge this licenses, there are always voices who enrich the discussion, here a comment about CC from the world of photography [read more in Joost Smiers, video]: “many people see the CC licences as an alternative to copyright, but in fact they are not,… Read More »

The Open-Access Movement is Not Really about Open Access*

  I just read (and enjoyed) the chapter ‘The Humanities & Open Access Publishing: A New Paradigm of Value?‘ by Eleonora Belfiore, (which interestingly is not open access) edited in a compilation made by the same author and Anna Upchurch [Humanities in the Twenty-first century: Beyond utility and markets **]. Here some excerpts which discuss… Read More »

Hacking Open Access: Sustainable publication for Humanities

Open Access in Humanities and Social Sciences, from Eelco Ferwerda provides a remarkable compilation of this discussion.   Although the open access movement has been going strong for over 10 years in the areas of natural sciences and medical sciences, the humanities and social sciences have lagged behind. However, OA is not only an exclusive STEM approach anymore,… Read More »

Collaborative Commons: Why cheap e-books won’t beat copyleft publications

20 October 2014 0

In this series of post we have explored to what extent can we rethink the licensing instruments (perhaps beyond Creative Commons); alternative forms of economic sustainability (freemium); as well as new incentives mechanisms (non-traditional knowledge currencies) into the Open Access movement. Here we will add some arguments to the two first aspects. Alternative forms of economic sustainability: On its recently published book,… Read More »

Criticism to Creative Commons: Why open access is not enough?

Q – What has Open Access in common with Creative Commons, U2 or Radiohead? A– All contents (either academic or artistic) are affected by CopyRight laws obsolete in the digital world. At least within the academic world (as in many others probably) to embrace the principles promoted by Creative Commons it is something increasingly accepted, which just to be… Read More »

How to make #OpenAccess in Science more sustainable? 30 possible answers

  Open Access and Sustainability: Exploring business models for academic Open Access based on the Cross-subsidy model of Anderson from Cristobal Cobo Romaní [also available in Google Drive].   As many others probably,  I always thought that the confusion between free and libre was problematic and likely to cause a great deal of confusion (English adjective “free” does… Read More »

A smarter accountability: combining ‘traditional’ and social impact metrics in #OpenScience

10 October 2014 1

digital scholarship: how open publication and co-creation could transform science from cristobal cobo   Wikipedia defines Open Science as: “… the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society, amateur or professional. It encompasses practices such as publishing open research, campaigning for open access, encouraging scientists to practice open notebook science,… Read More »